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Women in History Who Paved the Way

by Household Essentials • March 02, 2021

Women in History Who Paved the Way 

In honor of Women’s History Month, we wanted to dedicate a blog post honoring brave, strong women who have made an impact throughout our nation’s history. As you will learn from the biographies of the women below, women had to overcome many inequalities and injustices in the United States in the early 19th century. We hope you enjoy learning about some of the prominent women who helped pave the way for future generations of women and other human rights’ movements. 

 

 

Susie King Taylor

First African American Army Nurse

August 6, 1848 – October 6, 1912

 

Susie King Taylor was born into slavery on the coast of Georgia. As a young girl, Susie would eventually live with her grandmother who would encourage her to learn how to read and write. Her grandmother would enroll her in a secret school where Susie was educated by free African-American women. During the Civil War, she would serve as a nurse alongside her husband, Edward King, who was a sergeant in the 33rd Regiment of the United States Colored Troops. As was the norm for many of the nurses during the Civil War, she never attended a school to become a nurse, but she instead learned on the job. Susie wrote down her experiences from the war and would eventually publish her memoirs in 1902 which made her the first and only African-American women to publish an account of the Civil War. 

 
 

 

Mary Church Terrell

African American activist who fought for racial equality and women’s suffrage

1863-1954

 

Mary Church Terrell was born into a wealthy African-American family. Her father was one of the South’s first African-American millionaires and her mother was a hair salon owner. Influenced by her parents that education was important, Mary attended Antioch College Laboratory in Ohio and then continued on at Oberlin College where she would earn her Bachelors and Masters degree. Mary went on to found the National Association of Colored Women Club (NACWC) and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). The foundation of Mary’s work as an activist was based on the concept of equal opportunity. She strongly believed that when one African-American would succeeded, the whole race would be elevated. 

 


Nannie Helen Burroughs

Early Civil Rights Pioneer and Educator

1879-1961

Nannie Helen Burroghs was born in Orange, Virginia to a formerly enslaved couple. After her father died, her mother relocated with Nannie to Washington DC. Nannie excelled in school and graduated high school with honors. After high school, she wanted to teach and applied to be a teacher at a Washington D.C. public school, but she would be turned down. Not allowing that to stop her, Nannie would eventually be the founder of a successful school called the National Training School for Women and Girls. At the time, women were generally trained in domestic work. Nannie believed that women had the right to receive job training and education like men did. On top of her work as an educator, Nannie was a suffrage activists for black and white women. 



 

Rose Livingston

1876-1975

Suffrage and Women's Activist

 

Rose Livingston was known as the “Angel of Chinatown”. As a young girl, Rose was abducted and forced into prostitution in New York. She was given opium and became addicted. By the time she was 16, she had given birth to two children. She would be rescued in 1903 where her life would turn around. After being rescued, Rose would decide to return to the streets she was rescued from to rescue as many girls as she could. She would rescue thousands of girls from prostitution in Chinatown and would become known as the “Angel of Chinatown”.

 

Susan B. Anthony

1820-1906

Suffrage and Women's Activist

 

Susan B. Anthony would become the crusader for the Women’s Suffrage Movement. She was born to a Quaker family in 1820 in Adams, Massachusetts. From an early age, Susan was raised to believe that all people were equal under God. After spending several years teaching at a Quaker Seminary as an adult, she would later return to live with her family where she would become acquainted with William Lloyd Garrison and Frederick Douglass. While listening to them speak, Susan was inspired to do more to help end slavery. Before becoming a women’s activist, Susan would first become an abolition activist. She would later travel the country delivering speeches, gathering signatures for petitions, and lobbying Congress for the women's rights and  anti-slavery movement. Susan would never see the day women would be able to vote, but she died believing that women would finally be able to exercise their right to vote. 

 

We hope you enjoyed learning about women in history that have made huge impacts in the women’s rights movement!



 

References:

 

Susie King Taylor:

 

https://www.battlefields.org/learn/biographies/susie-taylor

 

https://www.loc.gov/ghe/cascade/index.html?appid=5be2377c246c4b5483e32ddd51d32dc0&bookmark=Early%20Years

 

https://www.nlm.nih.gov/exhibition/bindingwounds/pdfs/BioKingTaylorOB130.pdf

 

Mary Church Terrell

https://www.womenshistory.org/education-resources/biographies/mary-church-terrell

 

https://crowd.loc.gov/campaigns/mary-church-terrell-advocate-for-african-americans-and-women/

 

Nannie Helen Burroughs

https://www.nps.gov/people/nannie-helen-burroughs.htm

 

Rose Livingston

https://historyofyesterday.com/how-this-woman-saved-white-girls-from-sex-slavery-79090e606ca3

https://peoplepill.com/people/rose-livingston-1

 

Susan B. Anthony

https://www.britannica.com/biography/Susan-B-Anthony

 

https://www.womenshistory.org/education-resources/biographies/susan-b-anthony











 

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